Land & Peoples Acknowledgement

The Native Visibility Project (NVP) is working on developing sensitive and impactful Land and Peoples acknowledgement guidelines for civic and community leaders. A land acknowledgement is a statement that brings attention to the local tribe(s) and People on whose land the activity is taking place and that not only reminds those in attendance that their presence was not and is not without consequence to the first people of that land.

Having leaders strategically acknowledge the local tribe(s) in the areas they serve will remind communities that the original people are still here, relevant and that local policies must be created and implemented with the inclusion and input of Native people.

We seek to make Land and Peoples acknowledgments a process, making their place at the beginning of public and community meetings respectful and inclusive.

To find out more about the Native people whose land you are on visit: Native Land

From the Native Governance Center (nativegov.org):

TIPS FOR CREATING AN INDIGENOUS LAND ACKNOWLEDGMENT STATEMENT

Key components:

Start with self-reflection. Before starting work on your land acknowledgment statement, reflect on the process:

  • Why am I doing this land acknowledgment? (If you’re hoping to inspire others to take action to support Indigenous communities, you’re on the right track. If you’re delivering a land acknowledgment out of guilt or because everyone else is doing it, more self-reflection is in order.)
  • What is my end goal? (What do you hope listeners will do after hearing the acknowledgment?)
  • When will I have the largest impact? (Think about your timing and audience, specifically.)

Do your homework. Put in the time necessary to research the following topics:

  • The Indigenous people to whom the land belongs.
  • The history of the land and any related treaties.
  • Names of living Indigenous people from these communities. If you’re presenting on behalf of your work in a certain field, highlight Indigenous people who currently work in that field.
  • Indigenous place names and language.
  • Correct pronunciation for the names of the Tribes, places, and individuals that you’re including.

Use appropriate language. Don’t sugarcoat the past. Use terms like genocideethnic cleansingstolen land, and forced removal to reflect actions taken by colonizers.

Use past, present, and future tenses. Indigenous people are still here, and they’re thriving. Don’t treat them as a relic of the past.

Land acknowledgments shouldn’t be grim. They should function as living celebrations of Indigenous communities. Ask yourself, “How am I leaving Indigenous people in a stronger, more empowered place because of this land acknowledgment?” Focus on the positivity of who Indigenous people are today.

Additional factors to consider:

Don’t ask an Indigenous person to deliver a “welcome” statement for your organization. Cantemaza McKay (Spirit Lake Nation) explains this very clearly. Check out our land acknowledgment event livestream, and hear his comments at the 27-minute mark.

Build real, authentic relationships with Indigenous people. In addition to normal employment and family obligations, Indigenous people are working to heal their traumas, learn their languages, and support their nations. If you reach out for help, lead the conversation by asking an Indigenous person what you can do for them. Chances are, they’re likely overworked and could use your help.

Compensate Indigenous people for their emotional labor. If you do plan to reach out to an Indigenous person or community for help, compensate them fairly. Too often, Indigenous people are asked to perform emotional labor for free.

Understand displacement and how that plays into land acknowledgment. Land acknowledgment is complicated. Remember that the United States government displaced many Tribes from land before treaties were signed.

There are many types of land acknowledgments. Don’t expect to find a specific formula or template. Land acknowledgments that come from Indigenous people vs. non-Indigenous people look different, too.

Take action:

Land acknowledgment alone is not enough. It’s merely a starting point. Ask yourself: how do I plan to take action to support Indigenous communities? Some examples of ways to take action:

At the end of the day, remember:

Starting somewhere is better than not trying at all. We need to share in Indigenous peoples’ discomfort. They’ve been uncomfortable for a long time. Dr. Kate Beane (Flandreau Santee Dakota and Muskogee Creek) says, “We have to try. Starting out with good intentions and a good heart is what matters most.”